Category Archives: Argentina

Interesting Wine Facts: Fact #2 – Serve White Wines Cold

Well being last week’s Interesting Wine Facts was about the serving temperature of red wines I figured it would only be fair to do the same for white wines.

Most people already know that white wines are served chilled but most, like me, don’t know what that temperature actually is supposed to be. White wines should be served between 48-53 degrees F. This is usually the standard temperature that you’ll find in your refrigerator.

It’s also good to note that even though white wines are supposed to be served cold make sure you don’t serve them too cold. That can affect the flavors of the wine too.

Another good tip for white wines is to take them out of the refrigerator 10 to 15 minutes before you’re going to drink them.

If you’re serving a champagne, sparkling wine, or Prosecco it should be served between 40 to 45 degrees F. In order to get it to this temperature you may have to place it in an ice bucket filled with ice or put it in the freezer for 5 to 10 minutes before serving to get it to that temperature. Of course, you should have had it in the refrigerator before that but the standard temperature in your fridge is not going to be cold enough to get your bubbly to the right temperature thus the use of the ice bucket or freezer stated above.

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Interesting Wine Facts: Fact #1 – Serve at Room Temperature

Here I would like to introduce you to a new series of posts called ‘Interesting Wine Facts’. This is where I will share a few interesting facts that I’ve learned about wines recently. So without further ado here’s fact #1.

FACT #1: Red wine should be served at a temperature of 65 degrees.

Most people have heard that red wine should be served at room temperature and never put in the fridge. The fact is that in the old days in European wine country that was indeed true and for the most part is still true however, ‘room temperature’ there is different then say here in Florida. If I serve my red wine at room temperature you’re going to get a nice hot wine most of the time.

The fact is that it is best to serve wines at their suggested temperature rather than some arbitrary, nondescript instruction of ‘serve at room temperature’. The actual  serving temperature for most red wines is 65 degrees F. If you are in a cooler  climate you probably can achieve that by leaving the wine at ‘room temperature’ but if you’re in a warmer climate it’s perfectly okay to put the bottle in the refrigerator for an hour or so, use a bucket of ice to chill it for 15 to 20 minutes, or any other method to get it to reach its optimal temperature. No one is going to take your head off for doing that especially if they really know their wines.

Trapiche Malbec 2009 – Mendoza, Argentina

Description from back of label:

‘A rich, red-colored wine with violet hues, redolent of plums and cherries.. Round in the mouth with a touch of truffle and vanilla. The ideal wine for empanadas, grilled meat, pasta, spicy cuisine and cheese.’

As of late I’ve been hearing a lot about Malbec wines and when my friend, Camille, challenged me to try one I went out and picked the first one I saw and I’ll confess they were ‘buy one, get one free’ variety at my local grocery store. My logic was that being I know nothing about Malbec this was as good a way as any to pick one.

Being they were the ‘buy one, get one’ variety I picked the same wine but different vintages (2009 & 2010). The one I am reviewing today is a Trapiche Malbec 2009 and it comes from the Argentine region of Mendoza.

When I first opened the wine I noticed how strong the bouquet was. It was almost offensive. The first sip was overly strong and harsh but after literally aerating it with my handy new Rabbit Shower Aerator four times it calmed down a bit…but not much.

The color was a deep, rich, dark, almost inky purplish black. After a bit of contemplating on the bouquet of this wine I decided that there was a strong scent of plums as well as an earthy smell. The taste was very peppery, oaky, and plummy (if that’s indeed a word 🙂 )

My overall feeling for this wine is that it’s too harsh for my liking. I generally prefer a wine that’s a bit smoother than this. BUT…to be fair to Malbecs all over the world I have to say that I have virtually no experience with this type of grape variety so I will be trying other Malbecs in the coming months and comparing them to see what’s usual for this type of wine and what’s not.

Also, I will be taking a wine course next month that hopefully will help me to get so much better at describing these wines for all of you. I feel that my descriptions of the wines are vague sometimes but then that’s what learning is all about, isn’t it?  🙂