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RECIPE: Pumpkin Ravioli

I found this recipe for Pumpkin Ravioli in my local grocery store’s wine and food free publication and it seemed like the perfect antidote to the frozen fresh pumpkin in my freezer. I’ve been going through a phase lately where I want to clean out and organize and use things up that have been lurking around for awhile and my frozen pumpkin is one of those things. I slaughtered the pumpkin with my own hands last Thanksgiving and used some then for pumpkin pies and the rest has been anxiously awaiting it’s turn in the culinary world known as ‘My Kitchen’. 🙂

The recipe intrigued me for a few reasons. One, it’s got pumpkin in it as stated above. Two, the ingredients are so simple but the result looked so decadent and special. Three, the use of wonton wrappers instead of traditional pasta was the great thing that sealed the deal because unlike some of my Italian friends who have it in their blood to make pasta I am not one bit Italian and have totally missed the gene that’s needed to make my own pasta. Any attempts to make pasta have always been met with a big blob of glue that got thrown out. I know when I’ve been beaten and pasta is thy name! 🙂

So here are the recipe ingredients:

1/2 cup finely chopped onion

1 clove of garlic, minced

1 teaspoon plus 1/4 cup butter

1/2 cup blanched almonds, toasted

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary

1 cup of canned (or fresh) pumpkin

1/4 cup finely shredded Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese plus additional for garnish

1/4 teaspoon of salt

1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper plus additional to taste

20 wonton wrappers, thawed if frozen

Directions:

ONE: In a medium skillet cook onion and garlic in 1 teaspoon hot butter over medium heat until onion is softened, about 3 minutes

TWO: In a food processor combine 1/4 cup of the almonds and the rosemary. Cover and pulse with several on/off turns until nuts are finely ground. Add pumpkin, 1/4 cup of cheese, the onion mixture, salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Cover and pulse until just combined.

THREE: Working with 2 wonton wrappers at a time, top wrappers with one tablespoon of filling. Brush edges of wrapper with water and bring one corner of wrapper to meet the opposite corner to form a triangle, pressing own around filling to force out any air and to seal edges well. Cover filled ravioli with a dry kitchen towel while you repeat with remaining wonton wrappers and filling.

FOUR: Coarsely chop remaining 1/4 cup of almonds. In a medium skillet heat remaining 1/4 cup of butter over medium heat; add chopped almonds and cook, stirring until butter begins to brown on bottom of skillet (do not allow to burn), about 2 minutes. Remove from heat; cover and keep warm.

FIVE: Bring water to a boil and cook ravioli for 2 to 3 minutes or until tender, gently stirring occasionally. (Keep water at a low boil to prevent ravioli from breaking). Drain.

SIX: Drizzle ravioli with almond-browned butter and sprinkle with additional Parmesan and pepper to taste. Makes 4 Servings! (20 ravioli) 

Now as I usually do there was a change or two to the recipe. I didn’t like the way my rosemary looked so I didn’t use it. I used some parsley instead. I think that was the only thing I changed really…will miracles never cease!

Some tips on dealing with the wonton wrappers. They say to put a tablespoon of the mixture in the center of the wonton but I would advise to put a little less than that because a tablespoon was a bit much and had the tendency to ooze out of the wrapper when I was trying to seal it. Once it does that the wrapper didn’t seem to really want to seal quite so well. So put a little less.

Secondly, keep a little bowl of water near you and dip your fingers in it to line the outside of the wrappers with. Don’t put too much water or it won’t seal well but don’t be afraid to wet the edges of the wrapper either. It’s a delicate balance and it takes some practice to get right. My first five or so raviolis were a bit of a challenge but once I got the method down it worked like a charm.

Just like any other pasta when the raviolis start to float in the boiling water they’re done.

I paired this meal with a nice green salad and a Austrian wine called Gruner Veltliner that my brother gifted to me. It really complimented the meal fantastically. You can read the review on this wine here.

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RECIPE: Broccoli And Goat Cheese Souffle

Since making my first cheese souffle at the beginning of this year I’ve been on a quest to try as many souffle recipes as possible. Each time you make one you get better at it plus…well I bought all these souffle dishes of all sorts of sizes so I have to use them right?

If you read my blog regularly then you’re probably also catching on to the fact that I love goat cheese. I’ve declared my love for it in previous posts and so you know that I am not shy about my obsession. So when I found this recipe for a Broccoli & Goat Cheese Souffle at Eatingwell.com I knew it had my name written all over it.

The ingredient list is nothing to be scared of and most of them you’ll probably have in your kitchen anyway. The hardest thing about the recipe is the technique for incorporating the frothy egg whites into the rest of the ingredients but it’s not as hard as it seems and it’s all part of the process of learning how to make souffles. As I’ve said in previous souffle posts, you really can’t mess up a souffle. Even if it doesn’t rise like it’s suppose to it will still taste good so no harm, no foul. 🙂

I followed this recipe to the T (I know it’s so unlike me to not mess with things right?) except for the fact that I left the dried Rosemary out. I thought I had some but in the middle of making the souffle I discovered I didn’t. Too late to run out and get some I courageously continued on. I really don’t think omitting that ingredient harmed this recipe at all.

If I do say so myself I did incorporate the egg whites perfectly and was very proud of myself. How do you know if you incorporate them correctly? Well, the proof is in what happens in the oven. If your souffle rises like you wouldn’t believe you’ve done your job well and that’s what making a successful souffle is all about.

Now I must warn you, however, that like most souffles this souffle will deflate fast after taking it out of the oven. Unlike previous souffles that I’ve made though THIS souffle probably holds the record for fastest deflating souffle in history. The second I took it out of the oven it was already deflating and by the time I got it on a plate and to the table it looked sad. Really sad! Fortunately to put it out of it’s misery all I had to do is eat it. 🙂 It was really tasty. The goat cheese and dijon mustard gave it a great tang and the broccoli added some nice color, flavor and the feeling that you were eating something that was really good for you.

I highly recommend this recipe and encourage you to try it. Just remember not to take its quick deflation personal. If it rises well in the oven you’ve done your job well and that’s what counts and remember even a souffle that doesn’t rise well is still delicious so you really can’t go wrong.